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Lauren Glennon (’15) Gets a Firsthand Look at Sports Marketing and Management With the Asheville Tourists

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My name is Lauren Glennon and I’m a senior at UNC Asheville majoring in Management with a concentration in Marketing. I’ve always been interested in the entertainment industry and worked several street teaming and promotional internships in music. When I was offered an internship with the Asheville Tourists Baseball Club I jumped on the opportunity to experience the world of sports management and marketing.

I began working a month before Opening Day with a small group of about 15 full time staff members. While gearing up for the season I would sit in on sales meetings about sponsors of the team, seeing first hand how all the sponsored portions of a sporting event come to be. I would also be sent into the community to do grassroots marketing including prospecting local business that would be willing to display promotional schedules for the season or taking the mascots, Mr. Moon and Ted E. Tourist, out to various community events.  One of my favorite opportunities was going to ESPN Radio and getting to voice the commercials for our sponsors that air during the broadcasts of our games!

About a month into the season, I can say that the sports industry is an exciting roller coaster and you have to be prepared for anything that could happen. On a game day there is so much that needs to be done to be ready to open the gates in the evening to up to 4,000 fans.  First thing in the morning I will go set up flags along Biltmore Avenue in Downtown advertising “Game Today”. I will also go through our inventory to make sure the store is fully stocked with merchandise, answer phone calls regarding ticket sales, and prepare all promotional materials that are to be distributed including jersey giveaways, t-shirt gun t-shirts, gift cards, etc.

Once gates open, I supervise a group of employees called the “Jade Bombers” with the Promotions and Community Relations Manager. The Jade Bombers are basically our baseball cheerleaders and energize the crowd as well as execute all of our in game promotions from kids races, t-shirt tosses, and other giveaways. Every promotion is scheduled for a specific moment of the game, whether it’s top of the fifth inning or middle of the eighth.  This part of my job is extremely fast paced; you cannot stop paying attention to the game for a split second or you can miss an event you’re supposed to do. I have been continuing to develop my management skills in delegating tasks to the Jade Bombers to ensure a successful run thru on any given game day.

Through my internship I’m getting a great mix of opportunities to utilize my management skills and marketing tactics. The staff at the Asheville Tourists is great at giving me opportunities to try all different aspects of the sports industry, from allowing me to manage the store, supervise part-time staff, and interact with both clients and customers. They place a lot of trust in me, which I appreciate because it gives me a chance to accept new challenges and rise to the occasion.

My advice to any current students interested in working in sports management is to do an internship, or even two! Almost every single person that is a full time employee at the Asheville Tourists began as an intern and it’s a great opportunity to really understand the logistics of all that goes on behind the scenes. I can definitely say this job has given me invaluable experience in customer service, communication, and leadership that will be transferable no matter where my professional life ends up. I’m very excited to continue throughout our 2015 season!

Adam Pryor (’14) Synthesizes his UNC Asheville Experience at Moog Music

My name is Adam Pryor. I graduated in the Fall of 2014. The first time I visited UNC Asheville’s campus I knew the first place I wanted to see was the music hall. Lipinsky hall, with its unique architecture, immediately told me that something interesting lay within. Down in the basement was where all the magic happened; 3 separate studios each with their own type of functionality with loads of nice toys and gear to play with. The main studio was comprised of 2 isolation rooms and the main control room with vintage mics, tape machines, high end mixing console, and vintage outboard processing gear with a patch bay for easy routing. Next door was the mixing and mastering room, acoustically treated, with surround sound capability, and loads of mixing software.

The final studio was where my dreams were fully “synthesized.” Dr. Robert Moog was a professor for some time at UNC Asheville after moving to the area to build his synthesizer company, Moog Music, back up. After his death, the university commemorated his legacy by opening the Bob Moog Electronic Music Studio.Inside this studio housed several (understatement) Moog synthesizers and various other Moog electronic effects and processors. I had always been interested in electronic music, but at the time where I was from no one listened to electronic music and talking about synthesizers was like speaking a foreign language. I didn’t care about its popularity or what I could potentially do with these instruments, I just knew I wanted to be there, to experience what those machines had to say and offer. I hadn’t even been accepted yet and I was already making connections.

Getting accepted meant becoming determined, I had 4 years to figure out what I would do with my degree and how it could be something I knew I loved doing. Failure was not an option for me personally for there was nothing back home for me to make a living at or any other thing that gave me such impetus as these electronic instruments did. I went to class, took in as much as I could, and most importantly, I had discussions with my professors and peers to help me decide what path was right for me after graduating from college. I discovered Moog Music was operating out of Asheville and was opening a new production facility close to downtown. Even better, I came across a company in very close proximity called Make Noise, who made modular synthesizers. Here were my opportunities to make something of myself. I immediately started building a connection with the staff at Make Noise.

That connection gave me the opportunity to land a summer internship with the company. Around this time I started to become more fascinated with electronics. These synthesizers were spurring my further curiosity into the science behind the machines. Jude Weinberg, who I was fortunate enough and privileged to have as a professor was just the mentor I needed. He helped to broaden my interests and understanding of electronics, synthesis, and the physics of sound. He helped keep me motivated and would help whenever I couldn’t quite grasp a concept. He even gave me a temporary job in the music department helping maintenance old equipment and digitally archive music on outdated playback formats (reel to reel, ADAT, etc.). Professor Weinberg encouraged me to reach out to Make Noise and eventually would help lead me to my ultimate end-of-college goal, land a job at Moog.

This picture was taken one afternoon when we were given free time to patch and experience the modular synthesizers made by Make Noise. From left to right: Asher Hill, Matt Sherwood (in the back), Safarii Urena, and me.

This picture was taken one afternoon when we were given free time to patch and experience the modular synthesizers made by Make Noise. From left to right: Asher Hill, Matt Sherwood (in the back), Safarii Urena, and me.

I knew I was taking a big step, a step towards the beginnings of a career in a field of work that I had since only dreamed of. I immediately made an appointment with Chris Hegg at the UNC Asheville Career Center. He was tremendously helpful with tuning up my resume, getting a cover letter written up, how to approach an interview, and even how to present myself as a professional on social media. He basically helped me find the right way to represent myself, bringing out my “A-game” so to say. Professor Weinberg put me in contact with Dean Cavanaugh, productions manager with Moog Music.

All that was left to do was put myself out there and hope for the best. I emailed Mr. Cavanaugh with a copy of my resume and cover letter attached and then waited. At least a month went by without hearing anything, but then one day I receive an email back telling me that a position is open and that they would like me to come in for an interview. By this point, I was ecstatic and a little anxious. Regardless of getting a job, I knew to make it this far was an accomplishment. I went to the interview confident in myself. Again, I held on to the belief that I had made it this far and I wasn’t backing down now. The interview went very well, my relationship with the music department, my internship with Make Noise, and my experience with building electronics scored well with Mr. Cavanaugh. I presented myself as professional with my resume and cover letter. I wanted Moog to know that even though I was young and not even out of college yet, I was determined and reliable, that Moog was where I wanted to start my professional career.

Several days passed when I received a phone call from Mr. Cavanaugh telling me that I landed the position. Instantly I felt this tremendous pressure lift off of me. I wasn’t sure if I was awake or dreaming. I had done what I set out to accomplish at the end of high school and through out college. What was even more incredible was that I hadn’t even graduated yet and they were already wanting me to start working. When my parents found out, they were so proud of me for sticking with my dream and working hard to graduate and land a job right out of college. Its an opportunity that doesn’t come along often for many college students these days. On my graduation day, I was able to hold my head high for I knew I had already accomplished so much, my degree was icing on the cake.

Anatomy Professor Jillian Davis (’06) Shares Some Advice on Doing What You Love

I'm holding an eastern pipistrelle (Pipistrellus subflavus) that was caught during a bat conservation workshop run by Bat Conservation International. I got to go on a UNCA undergraduate research grant!

I’m holding an eastern pipistrelle (Pipistrellus subflavus) that was caught during a bat conservation workshop run by Bat Conservation International. I got to go on a UNCA undergraduate research grant!

I graduated from UNCA with a BS in biology in 2006, then worked as a vet tech for two years before starting grad school. I graduated from Ohio University in 2014 with a PhD in biology and began a tenure-track position as an anatomy professor at a small, undergraduate university in NC. I feel incredibly lucky to have a position at a university that emphasizes excellence in undergraduate education, where I am supported in investing most of my time in teaching. I also have the opportunity to continue independent and collaborative research (I am interested in understanding patterns in evolution of mammalian craniofacial morphology in response to trophic shifts, and I have gotten to work with some incredible animals including bats, kinkajous, alpacas, and howler monkeys!).

As I doubt many of you are likely pursuing a career in mammalian craniofacial morphology, I’ll focus less on specifics and more on some advice that I feel is pretty universal, which I think essentially boils down to two main points:

  • Whether you’re applying to grad school, med school, or a job, the decision to admit you won’t come down to how many things are on your resume. Rather, schools and employers will focus on whether you’ve done the things you’ve taken on well and whether those things have reinforced your decisions to pursue your intended career. Sure, there are gregarious go-getters out there who seem to take on everything and shine at everything they take on. I’m not one of those people! When I take on too much, I get frazzled and do bad work. For me, the most important factors for getting into grad school were coursework (I tried different things and identified what I loved. A semester in mammalogy and human anatomy helped me pinpoint an interest in mammalian functional morphology), undergraduate research (You’re at one of the best undergraduate research institutions in the country! Find someone who does what you love and align yourself to learn from them. I did a project with Chris Nicolay, and he was a phenomenal mentor who, above all, helped me figure out how to turn my interests into a career. Just make sure you’re doing it for the right reasons—interest—and not just to pad your resume), and working as a vet tech (not only did I gain invaluable experience, I also learned that I did not want to be a vet. To me, it was tremendously important to be able to find a career in which I had the freedom to ask questions). Ultimately, both the experiences and the confidence in my decision were important factors in my acceptance to grad school. The most important factor was that I knew specifically what I wanted to do and chose a lab that was a clear fit.

    I'm holding a cane toad (Rhinella marina) found in Costa Rica while doing field research on chewing in howler monkeys during grad school. The picture doesn't do him justice--he was enormous--hence my excitement.

    I’m holding a cane toad (Rhinella marina) found in Costa Rica while doing field research on chewing in howler monkeys during grad school. The picture doesn’t do him justice–he was enormous–hence my excitement.

  • Be sure to choose a path in which you love what you do enough to keep doing it on days when you hate what you do. If there’s one thing that will make you stand out as a student or employee now and for the rest of your life, it’s being willing to complete tasks whether or not you feel like it or see their merit. To be successful in grad school, you’ll likely be pushed to change the way you write, think, and even feel. This sort of transformation can be, well, miserable. You’ll have to stare right into the face of not knowing what you’re doing and the creepy and unfamiliar prospect of utter failure. Meanwhile, your friends will start getting jobs and buying houses. You’ll wonder why you’re doing this to yourself (your mom might even ask you why you’re doing this to yourself–mine did). You’ll read discouraging statistics about grim job prospects after grad school and drowning in student debt. You may not always feel like you love what you do, but you have to keep showing up and doing things, whether or not you’re successful or sure, because with time, you start to gain perspective, and the ups and downs get smaller. Ultimately, people who love what they do stand out, and so it’s important to remind yourself a little bit every day that you’re doing what you love. It’s good for you and for your career to nurture and express the love that got you where you are, and remember that that love will get you where you’re going.

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    Me and my 3-year-old son, standing beside a fellow UNCA biology grad-turned professor, Dr. Jen Hamel.

There is no doubt in my mind that I have a PhD and a career that I love because of the creativity, devotion, and investment of the UNCA faculty.  My career goal is to be like them, for my students.

Alesia Griesmyer (’14) Teaches the Art of Science

msgThe decision to attend UNCA was one of the easiest choices I have made. I knew that I wanted to live in the mountains and Asheville offered the perfect environment for my interests both inside and outside the classroom. I started as a freshman at UNCA in 2010 and after my first year I declared my major field of study- Environmental Studies with a concentration in Earth Science.  I later decided to add the teacher licensure program to my academic path. I graduated in May 2014 with my B.S. and NC Professional Educators License for Middle Grades Science and Grades 9-12 Science.

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The lab equipment I used at UNCA while doing my Undergraduate Research.

One of the most influential experiences I had at UNCA was conducting research through the Environmental Studies Department. My research was focused on the corrosion minerals that form on coin currency when exposed to different environmental conditions. I had the opportunity to work in the lab using the SEM (scanning electron microscope) and other equipment to conduct chemical analyses and identify minerals. It was an eye opening experience to view a world unknown to the naked eye. Creating and analysing these microscopic images revealed a new connection between the disciplines of art and science that later became the focus of my career.

Up close and personal with a coin, using the SEM.

Up close and personal with a coin, using the SEM.

Another experience that was highly influential in my career path was my ARTS 300 class. I took an interdisciplinary class called “The Art of Science and Science of Art” with Dr. Nancy Ruppert. This class helped me explore the deep connection between the areas of art and science. I knew that I wanted to continue my study of the intersection between art and science and when I accepted my first teaching job in Asheville I was given this opportunity.

My first job experience after graduation was as a founding faculty member at a brand new charter school in Asheville- The Franklin School of Innovation. Starting a new school provided me with leadership and collaboration skills that are important in any job. I was fortunate to be able to design my own elective course aligning the Earth/Environmental Science curriculum with the Art curriculum for 9th graders. I credit my ARTS 300 class at UNCA for the foundation of knowledge necessary in designing and teaching this innovative course.

My time spent at UNCA taught me how valuable community engagement is to an authentic educational experience. Advice I offer to current students and soon to be UNCA alumni is to never turn down an opportunity. Every person you meet and experience you have is an open door to new opportunities and you never know where they might lead you. I want to leave you with some words of inspiration that have guided me through the first year of my career…

“Don’t look further for answers: be the solution. Make a promise to stop getting in the way of the blessing that you are. Take a deep breath, remember to have fun, and begin.” — Jonathan Ellerby

I wish you all the best!

Sincerely,

Alesia Griesmyer

Martha Austin (’16) Engages High School Students with Mathematics

My name is Martha Austin. I am currently a junior at UNCA majoring in Mathematics and am getting my teaching licensure. I chose this school specifically for their education program, knowing already that I wanted to teach upper level math. I first began joining different clubs and societies, and becoming friends with all the other math and education majors. It wasn’t until sophomore year that I joined the AVID tutor program, and that’s when I realized how dead set I was on my career path.

The past two semesters I’ve worked at Asheville High School tutoring kids that were in the AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) program. Before this position, I had tutored sporadically for kids at my church growing up, but it wasn’t until this experience that I was able to really work with students in the schools and see how they struggle and learn in the classroom. Every day they taught me something new. Each day the students would bring in a question that they were confused about from one of their other classes. Then, in small groups, we’d ask each other questions to get the student to figure out the answer or understand the main point. These kids were so engaged in their work, bringing in great questions that they were confused about to their group. There were always rough days, such as some days students were just tired or not feeling well or didn’t do their assignment, but even if that happened, the students would still truck through and complete the assignment and help out their peers. I learned so much through this experience. Motivating kids to stay interested and seeing that light bulb go off in them when it finally clicks is what makes me want to become a teacher.

Being in this career path is a lot of work, but it’s so fulfilling. The education classes at UNCA immediately put their students right into the schools, having them do observations and teaching short lessons. The math professors teach you about different theories and how to learn, and different ways to come to a conclusion, which is beneficial for future teachers. If your students don’t understand the problem one way, approach it a different way. For future teachers at UNCA, my advice is to have patience and be flexible. I learned that patience is key, and having a good relationship with your students will help keep them motivated and interested. If you learn some things about each student, such as their interests, and use that to keep them intrigued, then the students are more likely to want to work harder. Each student also learns in a unique way, and being able to adjust your teaching methods to accommodate their needs is beneficial to student learning. If you make the lesson interesting, applicable to their life, and useful to them, then they will do better learning the information. These students, my fellow peers, and coworkers have helped push me to pursue to become a patient and strong teacher. I look forward to what awaits in my future.

Jessica Yee (’11) works with Publishing in New York

New YorkWhile moving to Brooklyn during the summer of 2011, I had the quintessential, clichéd “New York is so inspiring” experience. Although the physical trip to New York was terrifying (my parents and I had several extremely close calls with aggressive cabbies), seeing the Manhattan skyline for the first time was exhilarating and inspiring in a cheesy kind of way, especially when it hit me that this would be the new place I’d call home.

Fast-forward a week and I was bawling uncontrollably on the phone to my best friend in Michigan, moping in my unbelievably hot, air-condition-less apartment with four gigantic mosquito bites on my ankle. I was physically and emotionally miserable, and I was 100 percent convinced that I had just made the biggest mistake of my life.

But things worked out, as they always tend to do. I started my graduate publishing program at NYU, got internships and jobs, made some fantastic friends, and conquered my fear of getting lost on the subway (though for the first six months I was always afraid that each time I left my apartment I would somehow get lost and end up in some obscure neighborhood in Queens with no idea how to get home).

Moving to a big city where I had no friends, family, or connections was the last thing I thought I’d be doing after I graduated from UNCA with a mass communications degree. I was a bookish, painfully shy kid when I was younger, and I was terrified of being vulnerable in unfamiliar or intimidating experiences. But around the middle of my senior year at UNCA, I realized that I co uld not see a future for myself in journalism. The thought of staying in my comfort zone and settling for a job I wasn’t excited about really pushed me to explore new opportunities. At the suggestion of a colleague on The Blue Banner, I completed editorial and art internships at Lark Books, which sparked my interest in publishing.

Once I decided to pursue publishing as a career, furthering my education seemed like the obvious (and only) option at the time. I was accepted at four graduate publishing programs iOpen Roadn cities across the country: Portland, Oregon; Washington DC; Boston; and New York. They were all tempting in different ways, but as the mecca for publishing, New York edged out the other options.

I’ve been in the city for a little more than four years now. I work in publishing at Open Road Integrated Media, and I’ve been at the company for almost three years. I started in 2012 as a managing editorial assistant, and back when our department was basically just me and two other NYU publishing grads, I had to learn extremely quickly and on the fly. After a year I became the metadata coordinator, and I’m now the associate digital asset manager. I’m responsible for all the metadata, cover images, and content assets for our entire catalog, which at this point is about 8,000 titles.

I’m responsible for data entry and supervision of our title management system, and I handle all the metadata, cover images, and content assets for our title list. As part of the managing editorial department, I often work with our editorial, art, and marketing teams as well. In particular, I work closely with merchandising and marketing to set up price promotions and monthly campaigns at retailers. I also work with Ingram and other printers to make sure our paperback book assets and metadata are complete and correct in their sales catalogs. Customer-facing data is also my responsibility, so I maintain regular correspondence with our 30+ retail partners to make sure our books’ product pages are up-to-date and formatted correctly on their sites.

The fact that my job is significantly data-driven gives me a wealth of opportunities for the future, should I decide to branch out and pursue a job in a different field. Data has never been more vital, especially since digital commerce has become the norm and transactions are instantaneous. It’s more and more important for all companies to use their data to support discoverability, customer analysis, and general operations. As Open Road’s title list has grown, I’ve had to come up with creative solutions for managing our books in both internal and customer-facing systems, and I’ve gainOpen Road maped a lot of technical skills that apply to data management in publishing and other industries.

Working at Open Road and going to NYU forced me to do a lot of things I used to dread—public speaking, presentations, leading training sessions, and diving into new experiences without knowing exactly what I was doing. It’s made me more assertive and confident, both personally and professionally. One of the most important lessons I’ve learned, and one that I’m still working on, is how to balance my work and my personal life.

When I fiOpen Road booksrst started at Open Road, the company was still very much in its start-up phase, and as such, we all worked extremely long hours, including taking work home on weekends. Now that we’re more established and our company is constantly growing, I don’t necessarily need to work on the weekends or stay for 10-12 hours during the week (though forcing myself to leave at a reasonable time is still a struggle). I’ve had to accept that the work will always be there, and that it’s important to take breaks and maintain perspective. I’m not a doctor or a public leader. I work in publishing and help make books. If something goes wrong or a project has to get pushed back a day, it really isn’t the end of the world.

That’s a lesson that I wish I had learned a year or two ago—how to relax and not take everything so seriously. Big changes are intimidating, and leaving college and entering the real world can definitely be a daunting experience. I went directly from UNCA to NYU, and I think my fear of idleness was the biggest reason I didn’t take a couple of months to figure out who I was and what I wanted in life. I hope current students don’t feel like they have to settle for the first job they can find. Even though I’m not in a position where I use my degree on a daily basis, it was a huge stepping stone that allowed me to get where I am now. Don’t feel like you have to follow a specific track just because you studied a certain subject in college.

However challenging my experiences in New York have been, being here gives me opportunities that I never would have had if I had stayed in my comfortable, safe bubble. Not only do I get to work in an industry I love, I’ve made wonderful friends, learned from some inspiring professors and colleagues, and accomplished personal goals I didn’t even know I had.

Talene Biltmore

Talene Dadian (’16) Learns HR Expertise with Biltmore

My name is Talene Dadian and I am currently a junior Psychology major and Management minor at UNC AsTalene Biltmoreheville. Like many students, I started feeling the pressure to get “real world” experience. I wanted an internship and thought HR sounded interesting. However, I had no idea where or what type of company, if any, would even offer this. Thankfully, I spoke with the career counselors at the Career Center and they were able to connect me with an awesome opportunity that I don’t think I would have come across on my own, or even have thought of applying to. This past summer, I had the AMAZING opportunity to intern at Biltmore. Within Human Resources, I specifically interned within Biltmore Staffing Services.

Right from the start, I quickly learned and was treated with Biltmore’s trademark “Gracious Hospitality” that is extended to not only guests, but to all employees. As expected, I was given a multitude of research projects aimed at identifying niche culinary, horticulture, and hospitality markets and job platforms. However, I could not have imagined the amount of actual experience my internship would provide.  I was incredibly fortunate to have the opportunity to be an active participant in nearly every step of the hiring process. From interviewing applicants to hiring new employees and getting all of their necessary pre-employment paperwork and trainings completed, I got to participate in everything!

One of my faBiltmore west sidevorite parts was conducting screening interviews with potential candidates. While initially terrified that I would be the interviewer for a change and not the interviewee, the Staffing Center worked with me to provide training and got me to feel more comfortable sharing details about the positions, Biltmore Estate history, the legal rules of conducting interviews, the types of questions to ask, and what answers to look for. The practice I gained through conducting interviews has been invaluable. I was able to not only see what an employer, such as Biltmore, looks for in a new hire, but I also had the chance to reflect on the way I interview and what I should and should definitely not do in the future.

I also learned about the tedious, time-consuming process of pre-employment onboarding that goes on behind the scenes before a new employee can start work. I was swimming up to my eyeballs in I-9 documents, tax forms, ordering of drug screens, background checks, physicals, scheduling of trainings, and making nametags and employee ID badges, etc. all of which must be completed for each new employee! As overwhelmed as I was at the beginning of all these endeavors, this was an excellent learning opportunity about the processes of staffing any company or organization. Being thrown into a new situation is part of life, school, or any job and I am so thankful that I was challenged to learn new skills and think critically about new processes.Biltmore Fall

Another awesome part about interning at Biltmore was the ability to interview other departments and areas of Biltmore Estate. I had the opportunity to complete informational interviews with the HR Safety Manager, Benefits Manager, as well as the Food & Beverage Manager for the Biltmore House, the Outdoor Center Director, and many other departments. From touring the house, test-tasting the delicious cuisine, interviewing different HR managers, to taking a trip to the west side of the estate to view the winery fields, I got to experience it all. Every moment and interview allowed me to see how staffing fit ibiltmorento each and every aspect of the estate and how interconnected each aspect must be for Biltmore Estate to run smoothly and provide the best guest experience.

I think the biggest challenge for me was wanting to do everything really well and not disappoint not only the Staffing Center, but also myself. The biggest tip I can give to anyone looking for experience with an internship is that an internship is a chance to learn, learn from mistakes, and learn how to quickly address mistakes. Ask questions, say “yes” to new projects. Take this opportunity to learn and challenge yourself!

When I first began my internship, I had no idea what type of Human Resources field I would like to go into. After completing my internship at Biltmore, I have found that I love working with people. Working in a talent acquisition and staffing center would be something I can see myself doing and enjoying as a future career.

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Sarah Nunez (’04) and Carolina McCready (’98) Think outside and inside of the “bus” to Create Change

In 2011,  Sarah Nuñez (photo 12004) and Carolina McCready (1998) as well as their business partner Victor Palomino bought a short bus in an effort to continue their community work together and connect the dots in the work and needs of the people that they serve. In 2013, they officially launched the business, CHIVA, LLC – Transporting Opportunities to People.

CHIVA aims to overcome access challenges in WNC through creativity, arts and a bus. The project brings educational opportunities and multicultural activities to places where people live, work and play. This community “tool” helps neighbors to creatively access resources, entertainment and build solidarity. To learn more about CHIVA’s programs and events please like us on facebook at ChivaWNC or visit our website at www.chivatop.com

In 2014, CHIVA launched 2 new areas of work in addition to the arts education program that they launched in 2013.

Story Collection Project- We attend local events and film participants experience, thoughts, and ideas. Check out the video we produced at Goombay Festival this year at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zdQfQ_62UU&feature=youtu.be

Dialogue Circles- The bus is transformed into a “living room” for dialogue and we create the space for communities to embark on their own individual and collective journeys of identity, race, class, and so much more….

As a social entrepreneurship endeavor CHIVA is still growing, learning, and adapting to the needs of the community. We work with local festivals, community events, schools, and in neighborhoods. We are open to working in new areas and with new communities so please contact us to let us know what you think or if you have ideas at chivatop@gmail.com.

  • What was a typical day like in your position?

Sarah- “We share work and have various roles. I do a lot of sales and marketing for CHIVA. On a work day I am usually answering emails, updating the website or facebook, talking with potential clients, preparing contracts, and dreaming up new work and ideas for CHIVA.”

Carolina – “My time is spent mainly in planning meetings with CHIVA partners, running the Quickbooks (paying bills, making deposits, reconciling and making invoices), writing grants, editing video for clients and running events for CHIVA with my partners.”

  • How has your experience helped you prepare for your future?

Sarah- As an interdisciplinary major at UNCA I had the opportunity to work across disciplines and with many professors. Working with Volker Frank and John Wood  in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Joseph Berryhill in Psychology, Ken Betsalel in Political Science, and Alice Weldon in Spanish gave me many lenses to see my work as well as many mentors and students to learn and grow with. This academic approach lends to my analysis of many problems in today’s society.  My approach is to see the world from various lenses, to take in lots of ideas, and to think big.

Carolina- “My studies at UNCA helped me develop critical thinking skills and the capacity to research and find the answers to questions, issues and challenges I face.  Information is always evolving and being able to ask questions and look for answers will always be applicable in my life.”

  • What did you wish you had known going into the experience?

Sarah- “I wish I had taken a business classes in undergrad and understood more about cash flow. As most things in life go,  its also good to learn as you go and learn from real life experiences. We are constantly developing ourselves as business professionals.”

Carolina- “ I wish I had developed more hard skills.  Learned how to develop websites, or work with software such as Quickbooks or video editing.”

  • What advice do you have for current students who are pursuing your major?

Sarah- “Follow your dreams. If you have a deep desire to do something with your life, DO IT. A great mentor of mine always told me, “Sarah, make it happen”. I think of this anytime I have a new idea!  Also, It helps to have a team of people to work with and mentors and people that can advise you on how to accomplish your dreams. Don’t forget that there are people who have probably participated in parts of the work you wish to do. So, don’t be afraid to ask for help.”

Carolina – “Have faith in yourself.  As graduates, you have developed a lot of skills and knowledge; be creative and do not be afraid to forge your own path.”

  • What did you learn about yourself while you were working?

Sarah- “I’ve learned more about my style and how I work in teams. All three team members are different and we bring different skills to the work we do. I have learned more about what makes me excited in my day to day life and how to be a business owner.”

Carolina – “I have learned that there is always more work to do than there are hours in the day. It is important to be able to prioritize and manage your time. I find it is valuable to be mindful what you say yes to always create space to take care of yourself.”

  • What influenced you to apply for this position?

Sarah- “After 15 years of community work I decided it was time to launch something creative and original that could use all of my skills. I also see a lot of flaws in the current systems and ways of doing things. I wanted to create a way that used a team approach, outside of the non profit models, that would bring about community change and be a social entrepreneur business venture.”

Carolina – “I was excited about the CHIVA project because I saw an opportunity to work with people I respected in a creative and colorful way.”

  • What would you do differently if you could go back?

Sarah- “I would have created a business plan or thought through the number more before entering into a business. I am a planner and not having this part was hard for me for me to truly see the full vision of the work and how it would be put into action. On the other side of the coin, I’m learning as I go to, “go with the flow” more and learn to paddle my boat to the rhythm of those around me. As a “go getter” and “jump starter” type of person this is not an easy step for me to take….but as all things in life you have to learn, push your limits, and grow.”

  • Has your internship or job impacted your future?photo 2

Sarah- “Its made me realize that I love to be an entrepreneur and I also have a lot of creativity to share with the world. Its shaping my life daily by teaching me to about myself and all that’s needed to make a successful business.”

The CHIVA Bus at LEAF 2014 Fall festival. Participants talk about forgiveness in the social justice movement with Rev. Lyndon Harris.

Ryan Loll (’15) Promotes Hiking Habits in Asheville

My name is Ryan Loll and I am a senior at UNC- Asheville studying Health and Wellness Promotion as well as Spanish. I am currently from Charlotte NC but made the decision to stay in Asheville over the summer because I got a position working with Campus Recreation planning pre-rendezblue for the incoming students.

Before summer was in full swing, I got an e-mail from the North Carolina Center for Health and Wellness asking for individuals to assist with an observational study that deals with recording the coming and going of trail users in the Asheville area. The center is working with an organization called “Kids in Parks” who’s goal is to promote a healthy lifestyle for children by motivating them to go out hiking and participate in outdoor recreation. The kids who hike on these trails can plug in their mileage online and get cool prizes after reaching set distances.  Because this project is still in its beginning stages, Kids in Parks wants to make sure that people are using the trails, reading the trail head sign and brochures that are offerIMG_4689ed so that they can implement this program in other states. This is where I came into play. My duty was to sit at the trail head at one of four trails in the area and record who is using the trail. I was given a little booklet that was used for data collection and I would fill out information such as group size, number of children, approximate ages of children, number of males and females, and how long they went hiking.  The funny part is the booklet I was given had birds on the cover and read “Birds of the Blue Ridge” so that people were not deterred by my presence. It was people watching at its finest.

So a typical day of “observing” would be 8 hours on Saturday and Sunday as well as 4 hours during the week of sitting in my camp chair or hammock reading a book or playing cards until a group of hikers would walk up to the trail head. Then we would act natural (or try to at least) and quietly record what they said about the trail as well as general information. They would hit the trail and I would resume back to where I left off in my book. The days ranged from being busy with hikers to an absolute ghost town.  One of the hardest parts of the job was not only keeping yourself occupied for hours while no one goes hiking on a rainy day, but also recording large groups from schools who  would come out and hike.  On my first day of work, a group of about 30 exited the trail and I was quickly overwhelmed with counting the number of people. Thankfully, I had a partner with me for company so that I was not alone all day on a trail, but for the most part I was pretty quiet.

The funniest and best part of the job was trying to be inconspicuous while “observing” hikers. The most popular method of camouflage was pretending to have a pic-nic but when you are at the same location several hours later only moving to avoid getting sunburned, your cover gets blown pretty easily. Sometimes people would catch on to our activities and notice that the same two people are at the same location that they were hours ago and they seem to be writing something down every time people use the trail.  We were instructed that if asked, we inform them about the project, but for the most part we were told to avoid interaction and any personal information because this study was strictly observational.

At the end of June the project ended and my skills of people watching were no longer needed. It was pretty fun being a part of this program because it allowed me to get a firsthand account of how projects like this are implemented, evaluated and improved. Thankfuunnamedlly I had an introduction to health implementation and evaluation in a class I took last spring titled “Health Promotion Theory and Practice” with Ameena Batada that allowed me to understand my purpose in this project. I was also glad to work with this program because it allowed me to establish a relationship with the North Carolina Center for Health and Wellness and I now have some basic experience with data collection not to mention my people watching skills have greatly improved as well.

I feel that the main reason why I got this short term position with the center was because of my relationship with my professors in the department of Health and Wellness (and also a little bit of checking my email).  For any students who are interested in a position like this I highly recommend just stopping by, saying hello, introducing yourself and establish that you are interested in work like this. The professors and staff members in this department are awesome and love getting students involved in projects like this.  After this project I honed in my skills of observational work, multitasking as well as keeping myself entertained during slow days. Thanks to this opportunity, I hope that more projects will present themselves to me and that I can use them for Undergraduate Research.

My advice to current students wishing to gain more experience in their field through opportunities out of the class room is to simply go and talk with their professors about what you are motivated and passionate about and ask them how you can personally grow to excel. These faculty members are not only teachers but resources to help students branch out and establish new relationships within their area of study.  This project and others similar to it are great for building transitional skills such as problem solving, communication, critical thinking and work ethic. Once this project had finished, I felt that I got a tiny taste of what working in health promotion and research is like and I am ready to go out and find another project in my field of study that I am most motivated about.

Joe Phillips (’09) makes an impact at the South Pole

I always wanted to travel and to experience nature outside of my native state of North Carolina.  So when I graduated from UNCA in 2009, my goal was to get a job outside of North Carolina, in some place new and preferably, with a lot of travel.  Like most recent college graduates, I applied for hundreds of jobs in the months following graduation and wasn’t having any luck thanks to my limited real world experience and the economy was still suffering from the recent recession.

As the economy got worse and the outlook for recent college graduates went downhill, I started to revisit a conversation I had at UNCA’s Atmospheric Science Department’s 30th Year Anniversary Symposium.  This conversation was about the NOAA CorpIMG_2580s and since I had never heard of this service and thought it to be too good to be true, I sort of brushed off the conversation at the time.  I gave it some more thought and since I had nothing to lose just by applying, I sent in my application.  Since the NOAA Corps offered a lot of travel, great health insurance, and diverse assignments, when they offered me one of the officer candidate spots in Basic Officer Training Class 116, I gladly accepted.

The NOAA Corps are a highly trained, deployable group of commissioned officers that manage and operate NOAA’s research platforms and collect science data vital to the success and protection of the United States’ domestic and international commercial and environmental interests.  We also hold high level leadership positions throughout NOAA.  Since joining the NOAA Corps, the United States’ 7th and smallest uniformed service, I’ve traveled more than I could have hoped for, held responsibilities I couldn’t dream of just a few months out of college, and assisted and lead science data collection operations in extremely remote, beautiful places around the world.

My assignments have also been very diverse and exciting.  My first assignment was to complete a variety of maritime trainings at the US Merchant Marine Academy that specialize in navigation, operations and safety while at sea.  Those days were spent enjoying the New York City skyline, driving small boats around Manhattan and applying the class work in operational situations.  Following thDSC_1155is training, NOAA gave me shipboard assignments that not only applied my nautical training and helped me grow professionally, but these positions also assisted in the deployment and recovery of many Tropical Atmosphere and Oceanic buoys along the equator that monitor the El Niño Southern Oscillation cycles and hydrographic survey operations along the Virginia, Oregon, Washington and Alaskan coastlines.  I was also tasked to lead oil, boom and marine mammal helicopter flights in the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill response.

My current assignment tends to raise eye brows and seems unbelievable to most.  I’m currently NOAA’s Atmospheric Research Observatory (ARO) Station Chief at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in South Pole, Antarctica.  As the station chief, I help to maintain the facility and a suite of instruments that sample the atmosphere.  ARO sits up against what’s called the “Clean Air Sector” and since air here is free from direct human contact thanks to its protection under the Antarctic Treaty, the data collected is used to determine Earth’s background atmosphere.  A change in this background atmosphere can represent a global change and given what is known about the different climate forcings in the atmosphere, anthropogenic changes.  The instruments at ARO measure aerosols, greenhouse gases such as CO2, solar radiation, halocarbons and trace species and current levels of ozone, including the ozone hole.  We also collect a variety of air samples that are analyzed in the NOAA Boulder labs and at Scripps Research Institute.

The experiences and education I received at UNCA was a building block to where I am now and the internships and various volunteer opportunities offered by the atmospheric science department paved the way for the commission that has given me so many great experiences.  While I was a student, I was active in the atmospheric science department; I volunteered and participated in the student chapter of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), AMS outreach, the department’s forecast line, and every forecasting competition I could.  I spent my summers interning or doing research where I could and worked part or full time continuously.  My advice to everyone still in school is to keep your grades up and take advantage of every educational and social opportunity you can.  Internships, research positions and extra circular activities help you stand out in the job hunt, make you better-rounded, and help you get a job that makes you happy.  And of course, have fun!